Knock-down gene Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal Hydrolase (duch) resulted in reducing tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic cells and inducing apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

Authors

  • Dang Ngoc Anh Suong VAST
  • Tran Hoang Hiep
  • Nguyen Thi Thanh
  • Dang Thi Phuong Thao

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15625/0866-7160/v37n1se.6121

Keywords:

Drosophila melanogaster, apoptosis, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, tyrosine hydroxyalse, UCH-L1

Abstract

Ubiquitin Carboxyl Hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is an abundant neuron protein that plays an important role in remaining the function of ubiquitin proteasome system. It has several irrelevant activities as hydrolase and ligase, which also related to ubiquitin. Recent decades, UCH-L1 has been supposed that it related to pathogenesis of many cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism of these diseases induced by UCH-L1 has not been revealed yet. In this research, we use Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to examine the consequence of the knock-down gene duch, a Drosophila homologue of UCH-L1, by using RNAi. Specific knock-down gene duch in eye imaginal dics induce apoptosis and result in a rough eye phenotype in adults. Moreover, we found that down-regulated dUCH has a toxic effect that leads to the reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons and the locomotor dysfunction of the 20-days-old adults with a significantly different from control. Furthermore, knock-down gene duch in whole-body Drosophila caused pupal lethality. These results strongly suggested that dUCH plays an important role in maintaining normal activity of organism and giving a basic knowledge for many our researches afterward.

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Published

25-04-2015

How to Cite

Anh Suong, D. N., Hiep, T. H., Thanh, N. T., & Phuong Thao, D. T. (2015). Knock-down gene Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal Hydrolase (duch) resulted in reducing tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic cells and inducing apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Academia Journal of Biology, 37(1se), 267–273. https://doi.org/10.15625/0866-7160/v37n1se.6121

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